Super crested Queen Anne Britannia silver cup and cover London 1711 John Rand

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  • Super crested Queen Anne Britannia silver cup and cover London 1711 John Rand
  • Super crested Queen Anne Britannia silver cup and cover London 1711 John Rand
  • Super crested Queen Anne Britannia silver cup and cover London 1711 John Rand
Super crested Queen Anne Britannia silver cup and cover London 1711 John Rand Super crested Queen Anne Britannia silver cup and cover London 1711 John Rand Super crested Queen Anne Britannia silver cup and cover London 1711 John Rand

This beautiful large and crested Queen Anne Britannia silver cup and cover was made in London in 1711 by John Rand and measures approx 10.5 inches tall by handle to handle and is in dia across the top and 4 1/8 inches across the base. It has a lovely large anchor and dolphin to one side and a fleur de lys to the other, the body is of plain form with a girdle towards to top, it has a stepped pedestal base and a stepped lid with a large round finial atop, the cast handles either side are harp shaped, it is well hallmarked to the side and also to the lid rim, a very nice looking piece of good quality and in very good condition weighing 41.30 ounces or 1283 grams.

The Crest of Frankland
The crest as engraved upon this Queen Anne Britannia Silver Cup and Cover by John
Rand hallmarked London 1711 is that of the family of Frankland.
It may be blazoned as follows:
Crest: A dolphin argent haurient and entwined round an anchor
erect proper
Upon the balance of probability and without any evidence to the contrary this crest
pertains to the family of Frankland. As the engraving appears contemporaneous with
the cup it may well have been in the possession of the family who were created
baronets of Thirkelby2
in the County of Yorkshire within the Baronetage of England
on the 24th December 1660. The first baronet being Sir William Frankland (born
circa 1640 died 2nd August 1697) who sat in the House of Commons as the Member
of Parliament for Thirsk in his home county between 1671 – 85. If this hypothesis is
correct this cup was probably owned by Sir William’s son, Sir Thomas Frankland
(born September 1665 died 30th October 1726), the 2nd Baronet who resided at the
family seat of Thirkleby Hall. He, too, sat in the House of Commons as the Member
of Parliament for his father’s old seat of Thirsk (1690 – 95) for Hedon (1695 – 98)
1 There is also a secondary engraving of ‘a fleur-de-lis’ on the opposite of the cup although heraldic in
nature does not appear to be a crest as no crest wreath shown. It would seem to have no connection the
Frankland family.
2 Alternatively spelt as ‘Thirkleby’ and once again for Thirsk (1698 – 1711). Sir Thomas was appointed for a short
while as the Commissioner for Excise (April – October 1689) and was later appointed
to the office of Joint Postmaster General from 1691 until 1715. After the accession of
King George I in 1714, Sir Thomas was appointed a Commissioner for Customs, a
post he held until 1718.
He married Elizabeth Frances Russell (died 20th July 1733), the daughter of Sir John
Russell, the 3rd Baronet of Chippenham in the County of Wiltshire and Frances
Cromwell3
in 1683.

Categories

  • Silver
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